Politics

Stan Smith / December 08,2019

Looming Changes to Military Medical Care Cause Uncertainty

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Looming Changes to Military Medical Care Cause Uncertainty

By Jennifer Barnhill, Navy Spouse

See this article inside the December issue of Military Spouse Magazine.

Looming Changes to Military Medical Care Cause Uncertainty

With the threat of losing 18,000
uniformed medical billets over the next few years,
frustrations at the lack of
health care continuity may be exacerbated for military families. Couple this
cutback with a lack of program clarity, and many beneficiaries feel as though
their care might suffer. 

Uncertainty in Change

On a good day, trying to negotiate the intricacies of a
public or private health care system can be irritating. Dealing with one when
you are mid-Permanent Change of Station or in a health crisis can result in
chalkboard-scratching, hair-pulling frustration.

Military families are among the
most vulnerable when it comes to continuity of care related issues. Moving
every two to three years requires families to start over, searching for new
health care providers, homes, schools, jobs, and friends.

In December 2016, Congress passed
the FY2017 National Defense Authorization Act, the driving force behind
numerous changes to TRICARE and the Military Health System (MHS). Changes
already in effect include increased pharmacy copays and civilian-style open
enrollment period restrictions.

Stan Smith / November 30,2019

Climate summit chair: 'Wrong side of history' awaits those who refuse to address climate change

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MADRID, Spain — The chair of a two-week climate summit attended by nearly 200 countries warned at its opening Monday that those refusing to adjust to the planet’s rising temperatures “will be on the wrong side of history.”

Chile’s environment minister, Carolina Schmidt, said that the Dec. 2-13 meeting in Madrid needs to lay the groundwork for moving toward carbon neutral economies while being sensitive to the poorest and those most vulnerable to rising temperatures — something that policymakers have termed “just transition.”

“Those who don’t want to see it will be on the wrong side of history,” she said, calling on governments to make more ambitious pledges to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases ahead of a deadline to do so next year.

Stan Smith / November 30,2019

Buttigieg turns to black pastor to discuss racism, poverty

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GOLDSBORO, N.C. (AP) — As he labors to win over black voters whose support is vital to his Democratic presidential bid, Pete Buttigieg found a receptive host on Sunday in a civil rights activist who has sought to continue the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s push for a racially diverse national campaign against poverty.

After attending services at the Rev. William Barber’s Greenleaf Christian Church, Buttigieg stayed for a discussion with the Poor People’s Campaign — begun by King shortly before he was assassinated in 1968. Barber, a pastor and former North Carolina NAACP president, revived the movement to unite a new generation of Americans of all races to combat economic inequality.

The visit with Barber’s racially diverse congregation held dual value for Buttigieg, illustrating his ability to tackle racial justice issues critically important to African-Americans and giving him a chance to portray his agenda as bigger than appealing to one specific voting bloc. He also hoped to introduce himself to black voters and lay out his plans for their community through their shared Christian faith and values.

“Part of what I’m trying to do is talk about these issues, including specific racial issues around voter suppression and systemic racism, in a way that helps everyone in the country understand why we all have a stake in dealing with it,” Buttigieg told reporters after the poverty discussion. The South Bend, Indiana, mayor added that he believes he is making progress with black voters, including those “who may yet not feel that they know me.”

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